Batwa Rock and Cave Community Organization

Welcome to the Batwa Rock and Cave Community Organization.

Ashaba Timothy

History and aims:

  • This organization was founded in 2010 by Ashaba Timothy. He witnessed the struggles of the Batwa people, who once lived in the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest for many generations, but were evicted in 1991 when the forest became a National Park, and were not given any compensation.
  • We work with a local Batwa community to provide them with a settlement area, proper housing, education and income-generating activities. This community has approximately 50 children.
  • To learn more and see more pictures of the Batwa people, click here.


Community members of the Batwa Rock and Cave settlement (photo credit: Ian Markham; Instagram: @ianwildhope).

Problem Statement:

Currently the Batwa people in this settlement have been living in huts that are thatched with banana fibers, wooden poles and mud. These huts are not permanent.  They are being affected by heavy rains and winds. After about 3 years, they are in need of regular repair, but the damage increasingly gets worse, and so it becomes increasingly difficult to keep fixing them. Accordingly, we propose to establish a more permanent solution.

Possible solution:

We currently are looking for support to construct better houses and accommodation for the Batwa pygmies. So far we have managed to construct two huts in stronger and sustainable materials.  We hope to construct seven more houses in order to create better living conditions for all the Batwa that were resettled under our organization.

Our first priority is to build 2 new huts/homes, for the family of Mzee Byarufu Bernard, pictured below. They had 2 huts, including one for his oldest son and his family. But both huts have been falling apart. So currently they are living together in a single hut that is temporarily patched up but is likely to sustain irreversible damage soon. Below is a picture of the family of 3 generations.  Can you help us to build them a better hut?

Oldest son with family
Byarufu Bernard family

Budget per hut:

To build one new hut costs only $1,000 (US Dollars):

 

The total for 1 hut comes to approx. USH 3,500,000  which is $1,000.

The hut is more than just a construction. For the family that lives in it, it becomes a beacon of safety, and hope. It is a home!

You can help us build a home! If you (or your family, circle of friends or club) is able to raise $1,00o to construct one new home, we will add your name to the front. You can donate it in honor or memory of a loved one.

You can donate to this program online via our partner organization, the USA-based 501(c)3 nonprofit organization Sahaya International, which is based in Davis, California. Sahaya International was started in 1999 by medical researcher Dr. Koen Van Rompay, is 100% volunteer-based and supports a number of programs in developing countries.  To learn more about Sahaya International, go to www.sahaya.org, or watch their 20-minute award-winning documentary Sahaya Going Beyond (narrated by Academy Award winning actor Jeremy Irons) by clicking here.

100% of the donations that Sahaya receives will be transferred to our programs via the Ugandan-based organization Rafiki Memorial Wildlife Conservation Initiative (which is our close partner) to help us construct the new homes.

Donations in the USA to Sahaya International are tax-deductible according to standard IRS regulations. To donate by credit card or Paypal, click on the button below. If you like to donate by check, or donate other items (such as a used vehicle), go to our donation page.

Many thanks for your support! Any contribution makes a difference.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions:

  • Sahaya International: koen@sahaya.org
  • Batwa Rock and Cave Community Organization: Ashaba Timothy:
          • Email: batwarockandcave2010 “at” gmail “dot” com
          • Mobile Phone: +256 782-638153
          • Whatsapp: +256 775-475001

Community members of the Batwa Rock and Cave settlement (photo credit: Ian Markham; Instagram: @ianwildhope).


Click on individual pictures below to see a larger version.